Medical student resources

Recommended Reads for Residency

The Devil Wears Scrubs
By Freida McFadden

Newly minted doctor Jane McGill is in hell. Not literally, of course. But between her drug addict patients, sleepless nights on call, and battling wits with the sadistic yet charming Sexy Surgeon, Jane can't imagine an afterlife much worse than her first month of medical internship at County Hospital.

And then there's the devil herself: Jane's senior resident Dr. Alyssa Morgan. When Alyssa becomes absolutely hell-bent on making her new interns pay tenfold for the deadly sin of incompetence, Jane starts to worry that she may not make it through the year with her soul or her sanity still intact.

How nice is Dr. McFadden to her residents?

In Stitches
By Dr. Anthony Youn

All Tony Youn ever wanted was to fit in. One of two Asian‑American kids in a small midwestern town, he was tall and thin with Coke‑bottle glasses, Hannibal Lecter headgear, a bowl cut, and a protruding jaw that grew even faster than his comic‑book collection. He finally got his chance senior year as he lay strapped in an oral surgeon's chair having his jaw broken and reset – a brutal makeover that led him to his calling.

Egged on by his overachieving Korean father ("Doctor never get fired."), Tony spent the next four years mired in the angst, flubs, triumphs, nonstop studying, intermittent heavy drinking, and sexual frustration of medical school. He entered a shy, skinny nerd with no nerve, no game, and no clue. He left a doctor.

Heartwarming and laugh‑out‑loud funny, In Stitches is a universal coming‑of‑age story about a kid who found the best in himself by bringing out the best in others and finally learned to be comfortable in his own skin.

The House of God
By Samuel Shem

By turns heartbreaking, hilarious, and utterly human, The House of God is a mesmerizing and provocative journey that takes us into the lives of Roy Basch and five of his fellow interns at the most renowned teaching hospital in the country. Young Dr. Basch and his irreverant confident, known only as the Fat Man, will learn not only how to be fine doctors but, eventually, good human beings.

Samuel Shem has done what few in American medicine have dared to do – create an unvarnished, unglorified, and amazingly forthright portrait revealing the depth of caring, pain, pathos, and tragedy felt by all who spend their lives treating patients and stand at the crossroads between science and humanity.

With over 2 million copies sold worldwide, The House of God has been hailed as one of the most important medical novels of the twentieth century and compared to Sinclair Lewis's Arrowsmith for its poignant portrayal of the education of American doctors.

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