I like osteopathy, what about you?

Issues specific to osteopathic medical education and practice as a DO.

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I like osteopathy, what about you?

Postby this_barb » Wed Oct 25, 2006 8:24 am

To me, I think their ideals are closer to what my own ideals are than allopathy. Anyone else like osteopathic medicine just for the sake of itself, not the sake of being a "safety school"? Personally, when I start applying, I think I might make osteopathic schools my primary choices and allopathic schools my secondary choices.
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Postby mikegilmore » Thu Oct 26, 2006 6:45 am

I think I would go far an OD rather than MD except for two things.

One is that there are far fewer schools in less convenient locations (for me).

Two is I've read about some limitations on ODs not being eligible for some positions. I might rather be an MD who practices as an OD than an OD who has any amount of limitation on where you can work.

Can someone talk about getting an MD and then practicing as an OD?

(My unschooled impression of the difference between the two is that OD leans away from drugs and is more geared towards helping the body heal itself.)
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Postby wagdog1 » Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:39 am

OD IS OPTOMETRY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

DO IS DOCTOR OF OSTEOPATHY!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you.

At any rate, an MD cannot practice as a "DO" by title. He can use OMM if he chooses to, but I'm not sure it will fall under his licensure. A DO is licensed by the AOA whereas the MD is licensed by the AMA. Not to mention that MD is conferred by allopathic institutions as your doctoral title..the same goes for DO.
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My bad

Postby mikegilmore » Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:21 am

Oh man, sorry about that. Thanks for the correction.

My point is not about titles and degrees but about content of work. It seems to me a doctor with an MD can decide to approach her/his work with the philosophy of a DO, but the opposite is either not true or much more difficult.

I concede that my impression is not based on much knowledge (obviously if I'm screwing up OD and DO) so if anyone can give me a clearer picture of the distinction between MD and DO I'd appreciate it. In particular, I think of Osteopathy as the holistic, helping the body heal itself kind of practice and MD as the medicinal, sit back and let me toy with your biochemistry kind of practice. Please pardon my crude descriptions...
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Postby vbarbato » Fri Oct 27, 2006 12:53 pm

I believe it is the other way around. MD's, depending on what med school they came from, will have a much more difficult time looking at a patient the way a DO does. If you are not constantly reminded that the patient is a person and not just an illness/injury, then you can easily become very dehumanized as a MD. DO's are constantly reminded this and it is banged into their brains during medical school and beyond. So I think it is harder for and MD to use a DO philosophy than vice versa. As far as OMT or OMM goes, I found out the other day during my interview that the majority of DO's do not use OMT/OMM in their practices, and this point was actually further pointed out during my second interview a few days later. So I think DO's have a more rounded scope of medicine. They learn and know everything that an MD can do, and they learn something more whichi is OMT. They can use or don't have to. All this is proven in the latest medical school rankings. Two of the top 50 medical schools in the counrty for primary care are osteopathic. A few allopathic schools are moving toward a more osteopathic approach, such as the University of Rochester, which is like top 5 in the medical school rankings. All of these things that I have just explained are facts, and none are my opinions, so I can not see somebody thinking any less of a DO. Also I can't see it when people say don't apply to DO schools if you don't believe in the philosophy. To me that is laughable because the DO philosophy is look at the WHOLE patient. That is what we should be doing anyway MD or DO. Who the hell would not "believe" in that philosophy. If you don't believe in OMT that is fine, because not apparently not many practicing DO's do either. So i dont understand it when people say I don't believe in that philosophy, can somebody explain that to me?
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