MD vs DO salary

Issues specific to osteopathic medical education and practice as a DO.

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Postby wagdog1 » Sun Jul 23, 2006 8:31 pm

I think Joker was talking "out of his ass". Surprised to see he is a "specialist".

I personally only care that I get into medicine as a doctor. I want to be the one to make the decisions, and I want to be the one who is responsible for better or for worse. If I were to be a nurse or a Physicians Assistant, I would eventually feel as though I was being stifled.

DO or MD, I don't care. The DO philosophy sounds more interesting than MD philosophy, but in practice there is no difference.

It is my understanding that DOs actually have a tougher time bc they have to pass BOTH the COMLEX and the USMLE for some residencies. Double your pleasure, double the fun...

At any rate, the "prestige" is the only perceived difference. More people recognize MD than DO, although this is slowly changing. But if this is your primary concern, perhaps you aren't in this for the right reasons. I do undersatnd that it could be a concern that you are spending your entire life in this profession, but shouldn't that be secondary compared to your desire to start helping people? Just my POV--
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Re: MD vs DO salary

Postby Fanai » Tue Apr 13, 2010 1:44 pm

D.O. in other parts of the world are Diploma of Osteopathy not Doctor of Osteopathic. Schooling is not the same as here, so to compare US DO and other countries DO would not be fair comparison. So unlike how it is in US, it take less time to get DO then to get Medical Doctor (MBBS) in Europe. I am from India and I know several people that received DO from US and England. When they came back they are not the same, US DO"S are doctor but not England DO"S.
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Re:

Postby TriagePreMed » Sat May 29, 2010 8:02 pm

wagdog1 wrote:I think Joker was talking "out of his ass". Surprised to see he is a "specialist".

I personally only care that I get into medicine as a doctor. I want to be the one to make the decisions, and I want to be the one who is responsible for better or for worse. If I were to be a nurse or a Physicians Assistant, I would eventually feel as though I was being stifled.

DO or MD, I don't care. The DO philosophy sounds more interesting than MD philosophy, but in practice there is no difference.

It is my understanding that DOs actually have a tougher time bc they have to pass BOTH the COMLEX and the USMLE for some residencies. Double your pleasure, double the fun...

At any rate, the "prestige" is the only perceived difference. More people recognize MD than DO, although this is slowly changing. But if this is your primary concern, perhaps you aren't in this for the right reasons. I do undersatnd that it could be a concern that you are spending your entire life in this profession, but shouldn't that be secondary compared to your desire to start helping people? Just my POV--

I'll have to challenge this by saying that reputation is very important in the real world. Sure, you could say "who cares? You want to help people," but realistically speaking, the world revolves around reputation. The "better" things you've done are perceived, the more opportunities for open doors there exist. Having a DO will continue to have a stigma for decades to come. If you are okay with being stigmatized by some colleagues and patients, good for you. However, there's no rational reason to put yourself in a visible lower tier for the rest of your life if you can avoid it.

I personally wouldn't get a D.O. anymore. I thought about it a lot, but every time I see D.O.'s anywhere, they are doing this: 1) proving that they are equal to MD, 2) trying to prove they are superior to MD (saying they have better philosophy and what not), & 3) taking MD residency slots even though they claim allegiance to their degree. It's fairly obvious that D.O. is coming off as a "plan b" degree.

But just to clarify: my views are not absolutist. I understand some people don't fit the stereotype, and I do understand some DO's are legitimately equal or superior than certain MD's.
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Re: Re:

Postby CaribMD » Sun May 30, 2010 10:59 am

TriagePreMed wrote:
wagdog1 wrote:I think Joker was talking "out of his ass". Surprised to see he is a "specialist".

I personally only care that I get into medicine as a doctor. I want to be the one to make the decisions, and I want to be the one who is responsible for better or for worse. If I were to be a nurse or a Physicians Assistant, I would eventually feel as though I was being stifled.

DO or MD, I don't care. The DO philosophy sounds more interesting than MD philosophy, but in practice there is no difference.

It is my understanding that DOs actually have a tougher time bc they have to pass BOTH the COMLEX and the USMLE for some residencies. Double your pleasure, double the fun...

At any rate, the "prestige" is the only perceived difference. More people recognize MD than DO, although this is slowly changing. But if this is your primary concern, perhaps you aren't in this for the right reasons. I do undersatnd that it could be a concern that you are spending your entire life in this profession, but shouldn't that be secondary compared to your desire to start helping people? Just my POV--

I'll have to challenge this by saying that reputation is very important in the real world. Sure, you could say "who cares? You want to help people," but realistically speaking, the world revolves around reputation. The "better" things you've done are perceived, the more opportunities for open doors there exist. Having a DO will continue to have a stigma for decades to come. If you are okay with being stigmatized by some colleagues and patients, good for you. However, there's no rational reason to put yourself in a visible lower tier for the rest of your life if you can avoid it.

I personally wouldn't get a D.O. anymore. I thought about it a lot, but every time I see D.O.'s anywhere, they are doing this: 1) proving that they are equal to MD, 2) trying to prove they are superior to MD (saying they have better philosophy and what not), & 3) taking MD residency slots even though they claim allegiance to their degree. It's fairly obvious that D.O. is coming off as a "plan b" degree.

But just to clarify: my views are not absolutist. I understand some people don't fit the stereotype, and I do understand some DO's are legitimately equal or superior than certain MD's.


I'm doing a Surgery Clerkship MD program, the new Chief is a 5th year DO and one of the Attendings is a DO, no matter what premeds throw around in the real world things are different then you would think.

MD and DO are 100% equals
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Re: do

Postby AL_emt » Sun May 30, 2010 2:30 pm

joker200 wrote:yea, their is a highter percentage of D.O's in some European countries, because of the work load, medical students tend to learn a bit more and are taught on a more scientific traditional method than the D.O. That is precisely why the best doctors in the world are here, in AMerica....?? M.D. not D.O. they are similary but the MD for the most part is a bit more knowledgable than the D.O. though this can vary.. better to go the M.D. route, i have never met or heard of a great D.O. surgeon, and i know many surgeons all are M.D.'s


Heh... successful troll is successful :D

In the Real World (tm), U.S. DOs are the same as MDs in terms of responsibilities, procedures, residencies, salaries, etc etc ad nauseam (as it has been stated countless times in here). Our Chief of surgery here is a DO and he knows more (and is more skilled) than any other surgeon on the floor, hands down. Your post demonstrates that you are either trolling or are absolutely clueless when it comes to American medicine. The ER attending on my shift last night was also a DO, and she is one of the better ER docs by far. There are great physicians who are DOs and there are terrible ones, just like MD. If there is still some stigma within certain circles (I haven't witnessed it lately), then it is simply due to academic snobbery and misinformation, not because of any real difference in skill sets/education.
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