MD vs DNP: Which route should I take?

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MD vs DNP: Which route should I take?

Postby Loux » Tue Aug 16, 2011 7:36 pm

When deciding upon a career, I have given myself three options:

1.) I want to work with underdeveloped communities at the start of my career. I mainly want to provide direct, primary care at little-to-no cost and become involved with community planning. I would also be interested in disease/outbreak prevention and disaster/emergency care. When I'm old and gray (or maybe not-so old and gray!), I would like to work with a non-profit organization like Doctors Without Borders or the World Health Organization. I would also welcome the opportunity for research and conducting studies.

2.) I want to work in emergency medicine - either as (a) a care provider in a traditional ER setting or as (b) a trauma surgeon.

While I acknowledge that DNPs don't have the same liberties as MDs, they are high in demand because they require a fairly significantly lower salary than MDs for comparable care.

I should also mention that I do want a life outside of my career; I just want to be happy, money is not as important as my fruition.

There are three routes in which I can get to those careers:

Options 1, 2 a, and 2 b:
Bachelor of Science in Neurobiology -> Master of Public Health -> Doctor of Medicine

Options 1, 2 a, and 2 b:
Bachelor of Science in Neurobiology -> Dual Master of Public Health/Doctor of Medicine

Options 1 and 2 a:
Bachelor of Science in Nursing -> Dual Master of Public Health/Doctor of Nursing Practice

For reference, I'm a formerly-homeschooled 17 year old college sophomore with a current major of "undecided". :wink:
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Re: MD vs DNP: Which route should I take?

Postby CaribMD » Thu Aug 18, 2011 7:23 am

Loux wrote:When deciding upon a career, I have given myself three options:

1.) I want to work with underdeveloped communities at the start of my career. I mainly want to provide direct, primary care at little-to-no cost and become involved with community planning. I would also be interested in disease/outbreak prevention and disaster/emergency care. When I'm old and gray (or maybe not-so old and gray!), I would like to work with a non-profit organization like Doctors Without Borders or the World Health Organization. I would also welcome the opportunity for research and conducting studies.

2.) I want to work in emergency medicine - either as (a) a care provider in a traditional ER setting or as (b) a trauma surgeon.

While I acknowledge that DNPs don't have the same liberties as MDs, they are high in demand because they require a fairly significantly lower salary than MDs for comparable care.


You must be sourcing the highly inaccurate DNP sites.

DNP's will never be licensed to perform surgery.
Doctor of Nursing Practice will not be licensed as a Doctor of Medicine (Physician)
DNP's do not study medicine like Physicians
DNP's is an advanced Nurse practitioner degree and they practice the same as a Nurse practitioner the laws govern practice have not changed for DNP they are the same as for Nurse Practitioner.




There are three routes in which I can get to those careers:

Options 1, 2 a, and 2 b:
Bachelor of Science in Neurobiology -> Master of Public Health -> Doctor of Medicine

Options 1, 2 a, and 2 b:
Bachelor of Science in Neurobiology -> Dual Master of Public Health/Doctor of Medicine

Options 1 and 2 a:
Bachelor of Science in Nursing -> Dual Master of Public Health/Doctor of Nursing Practice

For reference, I'm a formerly-homeschooled 17 year old college sophomore with a current major of "undecided". :wink:


As for medicine becoming a MD or DO you do not have to do the Master of public Health to do what you want to do, where did you get that idea?

as a Doctor the route is

4 years of college major in anything prereqs for medical school
volunteer
patient contact experience
MCAT
apply to medical school
then 4 years of medical school (Study medicine not nursing)
then 3 to 8 years residency ( surgery will be at least 5)

DNP route

2 to 3 years undergrad
2 years nursing school
You will have your BSN then
2 years Nurse Practitioner school
then 2 years DNP
You would never go to medical school and if you ever wanted to be a Medical Doctor you would have to go to medical school and residency.

so as far as I remember its about 8 years to DNP, unless there are new "Accelerated" programs, in which I shudder the thought to rush people into DNP

As a rule I tell everyone young to think about time and their true goal, I went to medical school at 41 because at 30 I wanted to go but my 1st wife would not let me.

She divorced me anyway and I went 11 years later. Nothing wrong with nursing and DNP ( I'm an RN too) but why settle? if I was that young now and thinking someday I might want to be a Doctor then the answer would be do it, go to medical school and do not take baby steps, medical school is way easier and better when younger.
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