DO information

Issues specific to osteopathic medical education and practice as a DO.

Moderator: OlufunshoBY

DO information

Postby samson21 » Wed Jul 21, 2010 4:51 pm

I'm somewhat uninformed about D.O.s and would love it if some of you can help me out. First off, a good clear definition of a D.O. A lot of my research just tells me they are more hands on and more into nutrition and the whole body. I love the idea that we should focus on the individual and not the disease to cure an illness and I love natural remedies as opposed to drugs. Is that a good reason to get an D.O. intead of an M.D.? What is OMM? What is the difference between a Holistic Doctor and a D.O.? As a D.O. can you tell your patients to take a natural suplement instead of a drug to make a certain illness go away?
samson21
Gunner
Gunner
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2009 8:07 pm

Re: DO information

Postby AL_emt » Wed Jul 21, 2010 6:05 pm

Here is my opinion (I'll probably take some flak, but that's OK I've heard far worse when I was active):

If you have the choice of MD versus DO, it will nearly always (dare I say always?) be in your best interests to go MD. There's a reason that DO is easier to get into on average than MD. That reason is BS in my opinion (prestige, stigma, etc), but a reason nonetheless. Some of your top residencies can be harder to get into as a DO (although there certainly are exceptions), and this is probably due to stigma more than applicant ability. DOs are MDs as far as scope, ability, and practice is concerned (at least in the U.S.). I know a lot of DOs in the ER and in the OR and they are great practitioners. Just be advised that your chances of matching to the specialty you want may be negatively impacted should you choose DO over MD.

As far as the last part of your question:
The "holistic doctor" you are referring to is called a homeopath (or naturopath). DOs are not these. DOs are "real" physicians (i.e. medical doctors) that use scientific methods and principles (i.e. evidence based medicine) to diagnose and treat diseases in humans. Naturopaths are not physicians in the evidence based medicine sense, although some states allow access to some prescription medications and even minor surgical procedures (e.g. sutures), and most states allow naturopaths to call themselves "physician" as long as they don't misrepresent themselves as allopaths/osteopaths (and to many lay people don't know the difference between those titles would be an understatement). Naturopathy is considered quackary within mainstream medicine and is even lower in mainstream acceptance than chiropractic (which is a whole different topic).

I have to go to class and I'll be glad to talk with you some more later. I'm sure plenty of others will be chiming in for or against homeopaths and what-not.
User avatar
AL_emt
Premed Moderator
Premed Moderator
 
Posts: 373
Joined: Sat May 15, 2010 2:53 pm
Location: Mobile, AL

Re: DO information

Postby samson21 » Wed Jul 21, 2010 7:59 pm

Thanks AL, great info. I'm just lost at the moment of wheter I should go for MD or DO. MD is really hard to get into and I"m working my a** off to bring up my 3.479 college gpa. I've yet to take the MCAT. I guess DO would be a good thing to fall back on, but I get your preference for MD.
samson21
Gunner
Gunner
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2009 8:07 pm

Re: DO information

Postby AL_emt » Wed Jul 21, 2010 8:49 pm

As far as I know, that GPA range is good for DO, just keep working on improving it.

I personally love DOs; I find them (from an EMS perspective) to typically be less "snobbish" than the MDs and all of the ones I know are outstanding ER physicians.
User avatar
AL_emt
Premed Moderator
Premed Moderator
 
Posts: 373
Joined: Sat May 15, 2010 2:53 pm
Location: Mobile, AL

Re: DO information

Postby samson21 » Thu Jul 22, 2010 4:04 pm

Yea its good for DO but not for MD haha. I'm defnetely working on it though.
samson21
Gunner
Gunner
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2009 8:07 pm

Next

Return to Osteopathic Medicine (DO)